YES! “SHE” SPEAKS

Flabbergasted?

Prefer a broken neck to another broken heart?

with 7 comments

I love my solitude and grow tired and frustrated at the world; so devoid of passion and zeal. It seems, with such oblivious minds unable to fathom the boundless depths in meaning expressed with sincerity, command and devotion, spoken word just isn’t so openly spoken. 

 A poem I recently heard had left me deeply inspired, so inspired that I had to listen to it over and over again, until I was left impenetrably moved and in deep thought and contemplation. For those who have listened with heart, mind and ears intact will appreciate its invaluable passion and message. But for others unable to contemplate the innate message, I feel for thee. Like seriously, feel for thee!

The poem, entitled “She said that she’d prefer a broken neck to another broken heart” by Amir Sulaiman. A narration of distant memories of how a man so deep in love with his upbringing, that his counsel to another is based on this love. It’s almost as though the poem is a love letter to his mother, yet a reminder and counsel to future mothers. A reminder that motherhood and manhood go hand in hand. It is the love, compassion, zeal and sincerity that really makes the poem what it is. 

A message repeated throughout the poem; attaining love for the Divine is more important, fulfilling and rewarding than any other love.  “Having love is even more important than having a lover.”     It reminded me of something that Maya Angelou  once said: “A woman’s heart should be so hidden in God that a man should have to seek Him first to find her.”  How profound? Food for a thought: be so lost in love with Him that no one is able to reach you without reaching Him. “He’s gotta truly love love before he can truly love me.”   How can one who lacks something give it to another?

The poet continually projects the struggles in women today. When asked for solutions, his counsel to another is shaped by his experiences with his mother. “She asked me how I survived, by Allah it was my mother…And the stuff I saw her endure, I never wanna see my wife endure. So I know being a man is more than being male, and I’m focused on doing it right.” It is that linkage to his mother as the centrality to his being, the mention of his mother brought a tear to my eye. Love is certainly the bond that binds the hearts.

When I think about my childhood, I don’t think about poverty. I remember how she hugged me, kissed me, taught me, loved me.” Humble beginnings of poverty to happy endings of grounded foundation;  struggles accompanied by discipline in thought that one is able to re-emerge oneself through his upbringing.  Learn from life’s experiences as a means of better understanding the state of another. 

 The poem ends as it starts “And I know you prefer a broken neck to another broken heart, Broken parts that litter the night sky like stars. But remember, even the beauty of birth leaves its own scars. And know that you will find your home, right where you are; We will find our homes right where we are.” 
 
No other love can replace the love of a mother. All praise be to He most high for giving me such a beautiful, caring and giving mother! A mother who is there, a guardian in times of need, a mother whom I have found my home with, an irreplaceable bond; unique and divine in its own right. May He most high grant us all that home and give us the strength, magnitude and will to provide that same level of love, compassion and mercy to our future generation. Aameen. JazakAllahu khaire to brother Amir for that much needed reminder!  She said that she’d prefer a broken neck to another broken heart

She said that she would prefer a broken neck to another broken heart.
I said “Remember, even the beauty of birth leaves its own scars
And know that you will find your home right where you are.”
She said, “I know it sounds cliche, but I really am just waiting to exhale.”
She’s not looking for a perfect man, she ain’t holding out for Denzel
She’s just looking for a real man,
But she said “Most of the realest were in graves or in jail”
Just an upright brother, but she’s left with low down brothers, homo thugs, and downlow brothers.

And it took her some time with herself to discover
That having love is even more important than having a lover
But what am I supposed to tell her?
That it’s going to be okay? But it may not be.
It may be hard and ugly,
Difficult, complicated, rough and bloody
And I said, “So many women are struggling”

She said, “Yeah, I’d like a man to kiss me, I’d like a man to hug me
But he’s gotta truly love love before he can truly love me”
I said, “I feel you.” She said, “No, you’re not feeling me.
We are women bringing up seeds,
Our own sons grow up thinking love is a disease
Ducking and dodging real relationships, and just gonna take what they please
And they treat pregnancy like it’s an STD
If the test comes back positive, it’s a negative
And they are ghost in the streets,
Drunk in the wind, only a moment is spent and those moments are brief
Our sons’ role models are rolling stones unknown or deceased
They figure we can’t teach them manhood, so they’ll get grown in the streets
So in the cold world they find warmth with the men holding the heat.

I said “There’s gotta be a change.”
She said, “Yeah, it’s gotta be more than poems on TV”
I said, “I feel you.” She asked me how I survive.
I said, “By Allah, it was my mother otherwise
I would have been dead, crazy, institutionalized.”

“She kept us in the good neighborhoods, even though she couldn’t keep on the lights
So we could go to the best schools learning to read and to write.
Sometimes we’d be so broke, in the store, she’d have to pick between the beans and the rice.
Sometimes she’d put ketchup on a navy bean so it wouldn’t seem like we’re eating the same thing every night.
Two jobs during the day, and one at night.
And the stuff I saw her endure, I never wanna see my wife [endure]
So I know being a man is more than being male, and I’m focused on doing it right.”

“But when I think about my childhood, I don’t think about poverty
I remember how she hugged me, kissed me, taught me, loved me.
And I know you prefer a broken neck to another broken heart
Broken parts that litter the night sky like stars.
But remember, even the beauty of birth leaves its own scars
And know that you will find your home, right where you are
We will find our homes right where we are.”

~ Amir Sulaiman

Advertisements

Written by Magda M Ali

February 24, 2008 at 4:50 pm

7 Responses

Subscribe to comments with RSS.

  1. Wow..powerful..

    Miss Muslimah

    February 27, 2008 at 6:16 pm

  2. Word! Both to his words and yours. I know what you mean tho, you need to really think to understand the message behind the poem, more importantly you need to listen to the WHOLE poem not stop at certain points.

    But on a serious note, that was deep right thur!

    dig

    February 28, 2008 at 12:13 am

  3. wow deep!

    Lee

    February 29, 2008 at 9:05 pm

  4. Man he’s deep! Is he touring UK anytime soon?

    deeep

    March 1, 2008 at 5:09 pm

  5. love it!

    aww

    March 2, 2008 at 4:10 pm

  6. Jzk, God bless you all.. As for brother Amir touring the UK, i have no idea though i doubt it…

    peace
    ws.

    Magda.

    magdamali

    March 9, 2008 at 11:17 pm

  7. I remember someone asked whether Amir Sulaiman was touring UK, well i found out he is. He was in Central London on fri, and really blew us away with his deep poetry.

    http://www.radicalmiddleway.co.uk/events.php?id=1&art=25

    enjoy!

    magdamali

    April 12, 2008 at 11:19 pm


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: